Category: house

mcmansionhell:

Howdy folks, and by howdy I mean howdy, because this time our McMansion Hell yearbook house is in the 9th circle of McMansion Hell itself, Denton County, Texas! Sitting at a cozy 4900 square feet, this 4 bedroom/4 bath abode could be all yours for a cool $1.13 million!

In case you’re wondering what’s going on architecturally here (i.e. everyone reading this), this house is a combination of a two-story Spanish Colonial Revival (right) with a 1970s shed-style house (left) all converging in a fully formed lawyer foyer (center). The result is, well, weird. Let’s continue. 

Lawya Fawya

Unlike our earlier 1970s houses, you can see that this one has had quite a bit of renovation, likely in the early 2000s. However, some classic things still come to mind, namely the spackled stucco walls and staircase, which are likely original to the 70s. My guess would be that a lot of that center wall has been taken out in the 2000s-2020s drive to Take Every Possible Interior Wall Out. 

Living Room

As you can see, this house is very large and mostly empty – this room probably had more of a den feel originally and was probably divided up in some way. The ceilings are their original 1970s height (low). 

Unidentified Gathering Space

My favorite part of this room is the fact that they couldn’t quite round out the window corners. Curves are hard. 

Kitchen

Frankly, even with the weird pot storage, this is probably the most sane kitchen in McMansion Hell history (a rare success; a glimmer of hope in a time of great darkness.)

Master Bedroom

That TV is an entire football field away from the bed which is a great metaphor for my attitude towards being on social media during the, you know, whole global pandemic and economic collapse thing that’s going on. 

Master Bathroom

Ok OK I’m done with the social distancing jokes!!!!!!

Bedroom 2

That bed in that room is how it feels living a tiny studio apartment with my husband and my dog during a time of great uncertainty!!

Rec Room

I would love to see some statistics on what percentage of home gym equipment ends up on craigslist. My guess is at least half – working out at home is awkward and hard (source: I don’t do it.) 

Ok Ok we’re now ready to enter the best (read: worst) room in this house, which I have duly saved for last. 

“Theatre Room”

Alternatively this is how a pizza feels when they put it in one of those brick ovens at those overpriced restaurants. 

That’s all for inside, let’s head back out. 

Rear Exterior

Yeah I don’t actually know how something like this happens, architecturally speaking. It’s like the house version of mismatched socks and also both the socks have a hole in the toe and smell bad. 

Anyways that does it for 1972 – join us soon for 1973, which is truly a doozy – thanks to the folks on the McMansion Hell Patreon stream who submitted it!

I know that these are economically uncertain times, but many creators including myself depend on Patreon for most of their income, so if you have a minimum of $12/year to spare and are into bonus content, then do I have some good news for you: 

If you like this post, and want to see more like it, consider supporting me on Patreon!

There is a whole new slate of Patreon rewards, including: good house of the month, an exclusive Discord server, monthly livestreams, a reading group, free merch at certain tiers and more!

Not into recurring donations but still want to show support? Consider the tip jar! 

Or, Check out the McMansion Hell Store! Proceeds from the store help protect great buildings from the wrecking ball.

sonntagpunctum:

Juliaan Lampens
House Van Wassenhove, 1972
Sint-Martens-Latem, Belgium

© 2017 Carolina Coelho
Olympus OM10 50mm

danismm:

House in Switzerland, 1980. Arch. Pierre Zoelly.

sosbrutalism:

Stay healthy and positive in these times, and for that stay at home: Those houses in Rehbergstrasse, Zurich provide extra cozy atmosphere around a fire place in the interior.

How are you feeling today? And what is coming next?
From Monday on we will show you some brutalist highlights from BERLIN. So, stay tuned and be excited for fresh new pictures that we just recently included into our database 😉

Hans Demarmels: Three Houses, Rebbergstrasse, Zurich, Switzerland, 1963–1965

http://sosbrutalism.org/cms/15891411

Photos: © fotografieSchaulin / www.kerstinrose.de

sosbrutalism:

Those quite old pictures show a brutalist gem with an exorbitant terrace and a view for dreaming! Definitely a home goal!

Vittoriano Viganò: Casa La Scala, San Felice del Benaco, Italy, 1956–1958

http://sosbrutalism.org/cms/19427595

Photos: OfHouses (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

communedesign:

Though a lesser acknowledged work, Villa Stenersen in Oslo is a true celebration of functionalism. It’s an especially interesting site to analyze because the villa’s architect, Arne Korsmo was commissioned to create a building with two clear and potentially opposing purposes: a family home for the Stenersens and an art gallery for their large and impressive collection. When Korsmo began designing it in 1937, it was this duality that beckoned such thoughtful consideration of each element, from the architecture to the interior color palette. 

Considering the aforementioned, take the single rounded column in the main room. It functions to soften the rest of the room’s stark angles, but doesn’t cover them up or overwhelm them. It’s used resourcefully in communication with its neighbors, but leaves room for art. This level of restraint is what makes functionalism work so well. Where there are hard and practical materials employed, there may also be vibrant colors and rounded edges to suggest that a balance must remain between function and decoration. Another example of this duality comes in the form of the glass bricks that comprise the windows. Just the right amount of filtered light shines through for viewing the art collection, but they also afford just the right amount of privacy for a family. In fact, the light and openness of the space is something that Korsmo emphasized to serve both of the building’s functions maximally. 

The former home was donated by its original owner, Rolf Stenersen, to become a national museum, and has been restored over time to its intended glory. Aside from vintage pictures and Korsmo’s original drawings, the photos shown here come from a series of photographers (Ake Lindman, Tekla Severin, Mikal Strom, Federico Covre) who have visited the space at different times within the restoration process. 

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Arne Korsmo dancing with his wife, Grete.

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sosbrutalism:

Stay healthy and positive in these times, and for that stay at home: We wouldn’t mind to spend our time here in this house in São Paulo, built by Paulo Mendes da Rocha in the 60s.  

Paulo Mendes da Rocha: Butantã Houses / Casa Paulo Mendes Da Rocha, São Paulo, Brazil, 1964–1966

http://sosbrutalism.org/cms/15890465

Photos: © Christian Schaulin 2009

#SOSBrutalism #stayhealthy #stayhome #staypositive #flattenthecurve #corona

danismm:

Villa Paa Lundevangsvej,

Hellerup, Denmark 1908. Arch. Carl Brummer.

ofhouses:

296. Jean Nouvel (with François Seigneur &
Roland Baltera) /// Maison Delbigot /// Sainte-Livrade-sur-Lot, France
/// 1970-1973

OfHouses presents “Pritzkers’ First Houses”:
Jean Nouvel (Pritzker 2008) designed this house at the age of 25, when he was still a student working in the office of Claude Parent and Paul Virillo. The design is obviously influenced by Parent’s research on ‘L’architecture oblique’, a topic Nouvel continued to explore also in his 1974 design for the Maison Delanghe.
(Photos: © Ateliers Jean Nouvel. Source: curbed.com; ebay.com.)

nordichouses:

stavanger, norge / stavanger, noreg / stavanger, norway